Adventure Works brand package now available!

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Super short post today.

With the release of an updated test/demo Azure VM for Power BI Report Server on Monday, we thought it made sense to provide a new Adventure Works brand package for everyone to use in their demos/presentations to go along with it.  Feel free to download and use with Reporting Services 2016/2017 or Power BI Report Server – https://1drv.ms/u/s!Au6-0xX27UdgnOIapntXPaoPcqqOWQ

Thanks!

Updated demo VM for Power BI Report Server now available!

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For those of you who enjoy using the test/dev/demo VM template the team has in Azure for Power BI Report Server, we’ve gone ahead and updated it with the latest preview we released a few weeks back.  With that update, we’ve made a few additional changes to the template as well –

– Office Online Server is now automatically installed and configured for you when you spin up a new environment.  There is also an Excel workbook available as one of the sample reports. (Please note – we do NOT currently setup an Analysis Services instance running in PowerPivot mode for you to use with the VM.  You can do that manually if you’d like by using the SQL install media already on the VM.)

– We now deploy two VM’s and setup a sample domain for them to allow you to use Office Online Server.  They will both be the same size you select in the VM setup process initially – you may re-size them if you’d like through the Azure portal at any time.  We did this to allow the widest number of regions access to the VM template, since not every VM size is available in every region.  This should help make sure you don’t accidentally select a VM that isn’t available in your region, and have the deployment fail for you. 

– We’ve added additional sample RDL reports with the VM for your use.

You can get started with the template in Azure here –http://bit.ly/2f2aWyn

I hope you find the latest updates valuable, and thanks for reading as always!

Ten tips for the August Preview of Power BI Report Server

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Happy Friday all!

Last week, we announced the latest preview of Power BI Report Server, which included new functionality like additional data source support and support for viewing Excel Workbooks.  As you’re trying these new features out, I wanted to highlight some items you might find useful as you get started testing –

1. Keep in mind Office Online Server requires you be part of a domain when you set it up on a server, or else installation will fail.  This is additional requirement beyond what Power BI Report Server requires on its own, where it can run on a server that isn’t domain-joined.  Keep that in mind if your demo environment is your personal laptop.

2. If you’re setting up an environment for test/dev/demo purposes, you can install both Office Online Server and Power BI Report Server on the same machine if you’d like.  This isn’t a supported scenario for production purposes, obviously, but might simplify the setup of your test/demo environment.

3. You can embed Excel Workbooks into other applications using the simple embed functionality at the end of your report URL – for example, I embedded the following live Excel workbook into a PowerPoint slide using the web viewer app from the Office Store, so I can interact with the report during presentations.

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4. When installing the version of Power BI Desktop (August 2017) we shipped with the preview, it will normally upgrade the June 2017 version of Power BI Desktop for Report Server if you have that installed.  For some people, they’d like to run it side-by-side with the GA version of desktop for PBI Report Server and not upgrade it.  You can do that – just install the “x64” version if you are running the 32-bit version of desktop on your machine, or vice versa.  This should leave you with both versions (in addition to the version for the service if you have that installed as well).  Please note – this should only be done on machines you are using for testing or development purposes, as this isn’t an officially supported configuration.

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5. If you have multiple versions of Power BI desktop installed, the behavior is designed to always default to the last version you installed when you double-click on a Power BI Desktop file to open it.  If you’d like to use a different version of the desktop you have installed on your machine with a particular report, make sure you open that first, then open the file you’d like to work with.

6. Have you tried the comments feature yet?  You can add comments to any report in Power BI Report Server (including Excel Workbooks) by clicking the comments icon on the right hand part of the screen and then add your comments, along with an attachment file if you’d like.

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7. If you want to use a live Analysis Services connection with an Excel Workbook in Power BI Report Server, you’ll need to make sure the machine running PBI RS is an administrator on the Analysis Services instance for this to work, since we’re using EffectiveUserName in Office Online Server to make the connection.  John White talks more about this in his blog for SharePoint 2016 and OOS setup as well.

8. If for some reason you need to access the more advanced settings for Power BI Report Server via SQL Server Management Studio, you’ll need to connect using the reportserver endpoint, like in the following example –

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9. One item you can turn on via Management Studio in Power BI Report Server is the “My Reports” functionality.  This is a simple way to enable access for your organization to a personalized area where users can store and author content in and have immediate access to the report server as long as they exist in Active Directory.  It’s a little different than “Favorites”, where users can tag reports that they want to see in a single view.  Definitely check out it if you haven’t already and see if it makes sense for you and your organizational needs.

10. Don’t forget to apply a brand package to your report server if you’d like to personalize it with your company/team/personal logo and colors!

With that, I’m happy to wish you a great Labor Day weekend (here in the USA, anyways), and thanks as always for reading!

Learn more about Power BI Report Server at SQL Saturday Vancouver

Quick blog post today to let you all know I’ll be presenting at SQL Saturday Vancouver next Saturday, August 26th about Power BI Report Server.  This will be a chance to hear more about exactly what it is, how it can help you and your business AND discuss what new features and functionality will be coming soon.  And if you decide to attend, there’s probably a good chance you’ll see demos of the latest functionality we have planned for the next product update coming later this year!

If you’d like to attend SQL Saturday next week to see me or many other more talented presenters, you can learn more at the link here – http://www.sqlsaturday.com/635/EventHome.aspx

Look forward to seeing you there and being as confused by the funny looking money in Canada as I am.  See you next weekend!

How Microsoft Forms, Flow and Power BI can reshape the classroom

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If you read my last blogpost, you know I have two kids.  One is in middle school, while the other is in elementary school.  While certain things have gotten more modern for them compared to my time in school, many parts of their day to day activities have not.  For example, it always surprises me that my daughter is issued a laptop for the school year, but a large part of her testing is still done on paper.  The teacher then puts the scores in online, and if we want to see them, we have to remember to go and check a different website.  Sometimes the original test paper is never even returned.  It makes it hard to take action and help her focus her studies for the next test.

This is a major reason I was so happy to see Microsoft Forms released recently.  It allows teachers to make quizzes where students can answer questions and see right away what they got right/wrong and their score.   It’s incredible simple to get started –

1. Click “New Quiz”

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2. Enter a Title (or optionally, a picture) and click “Add question” and which type of question

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3. Enter the question details, marking things like which is the correct answer, whether it is required, etc.  Repeat until you’ve done creating questions.

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4. Share it out to the students, or make a public link and share it with anyone!

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If you’re thinking Google Forms does something similar, yes, I know.  But Google Forms doesn’t integrate with Microsoft Flow, while Microsoft Forms now does.  Now it’s possible to set up an e-mail alert to the parents/tutor/whomever and send the results when their son/daughter has finished the test.  Now before you scream “helicopter parent”, it’s important to keep this in context.  I wouldn’t expect to have the teacher do this for every test, or for every student.  But there are times where it could be quite valuable and a great way to drive action, vs. hoping that you go check/your kid tells you/etc.

To setup a new flow with Microsoft Flow, it’s really easy.  You open the Flow app from your Office 365 account and click “Create From Blank” –

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Next, type “Forms” to see all the different items for Microsoft Forms you can trigger an action for –

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After selecting that, I choose the form from the dropdown to create the Flow for –

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I want to make it conditional based on the e-mail address entered for the first question.  I select “Add a condition” and the question I want to trigger the flow based on the student response –

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Then I entered the condition parameter and value to match, and what to do if it matches –

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I save the flow, and now I’ll get an e-mail when she finishes this quiz, along with her answers (if that is setup to be included).

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This also allows me to do things like setup a Flow for inserting a new row in an Excel document when a student answers a question, etc.  That makes it easy to quickly analyze the results in Power BI and see the total points she got vs. total available points!

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It took me less than a half an hour to create a quiz, create a flow, and view the results in Power BI.  I’m excited to see the potential there for students and teachers to take advantage of this.  Personally, I’m already thinking of some great new ways to I could see everyone use these tools and others from Microsoft to engage throughout the entire school year.

Thanks for reading!

Tiggee, Batman and Power BI Premium

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On the eve of the Microsoft Data Insights Summit, I thought I’d finally write the story behind the picture I’ve included with this post.  How does this story relate to the recent announcement around Power BI Premium?  Well, I’ll leave that up to you to decide if it does, or if it’s simply a cute little story that involves my son Matthew (who has been bugging me to write about him on here).

A couple years ago, my son asked his sister Caitlin and I to play Monopoly with him.   We happily agreed, and went downstairs to the family room.  But we didn’t see the usual setup.  Instead, we were greeted with what you see in the picture.

“What the heck is this?” his sister asked.  “This isn’t Monopoly!”

“I know – now it’s AWESOME Monopoly!” he replied.

“Awesome Monopoly?  That sounds stupid.  I don’t want to play that.”

“C’mon, please – it’ll be fun.”

“No it won’t – it looks dumb.  I’m going back upstairs.”  With that, she turned and stomped out of the room, taking Happy Bear with her.

I winced.  This had played out many times before, and the ending had always been the same.  I glanced towards the kitchen, seeing if the tissue box was still sitting on the counter from an earlier incident.  But it wasn’t needed – he just smiled, sat down and started re-arranging Batman to make room for me.

“She’ll be back,” he said.  “You’ll still play with me, won’t you dad?”

“Um, sure.  Awesome Monopoly sounds, um, awesome,” I said, not quite sure what I was in for.

He tried to explain the rules , and I’ll admit, they seemed pretty confusing the first time he explained them to me.  I don’t remember everything he laid out, but one rule he mentioned during this initial explanation was if you rolled a 12 and landed on “Chance”, Batman got put in jail for a turn OR you had to draw a playing card.

“Buddy, I gotta be honest – I don’t fully understand some of these rules you’ve added.” I told him.  “Do you think we could make it a little less confusing?”

“What do you mean?  We haven’t even started yet.”

“Yeah, I know, but some of these rules . . .”

I didn’t want to push too hard, but at the same time, I couldn’t imagine the game going well if the Elf on the Shelf remained the banker for the entire game.

“Okay, new rule!  We can always change the rules if we decide they’re dumb.”

“Really?” I asked.

“Yep – that’s why it’s Awesome Monopoly.  We can keep making it more and more awesome together!”

I shook my head and laughed.  “Sure, pal, that sounds fair.  I’ll let you go first.”

We went a few rounds, me laughing and him asking me each time someone went how he could make it even more “awesome”.

“I’ll admit, pal, this is a lot of fun.”

“Yay – I knew you’d like it!  Can you go tell Caitlin how much fun it is?”

“Sure.”

I nodded, left the room, and came back with her having agreed to play after hearing how it great it was (and Happy Bear even came back too).

“Caitlin’s back – woohoo!”  He proceeded to run around the room and make sounds like a choo-choo train.  “Yayyyy!”

The game played out, and any time someone thought of a way to make the game even more awesome, we talked about it, tweaked the rules and kept making the game more and more awesome!  (My kids used to like to say awesome A LOT).

So what’s the moral of the story?  It’s either –

1. Batman cheats

or

2. Power BI Premium = Awesome Monopoly.

or

3. Chris needs better blog topics

If you’re coming to Seattle for the conference, I’ll see you next week!

How to use SQL Server on Linux to host your Reporting Services catalog

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Let me get this out of the way upfront before we get to the good stuff.

**This is not yet officially supported by Microsoft.  We will do an official post when it is**

There we go.

While you can’t run the front end of SQL Server Reporting Services on Linux, many folks would potentially like to host the backend catalogs on SQL Server on Linux.  I was wondering over the weekend if this worked quite yet, considering that SQL Server on Linux had just introduced SQL Server Agent support as of CTP 1.4.  So, thanks to Microsoft Azure and some spare time, I decided to give it a go.

First, I used the SQL Server vNext on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 image in Azure to setup my Linux VM.  This is the easiest way to get started by far, and there is a complete walkthrough how to set this up end to end here – https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/linux/sql-server-linux-azure-virtual-machine

Search filter for SQL Server vNext VM images

I used PuTTY to connect to my Linux instance via the IP address, and I didn’t install the SQL Server Tools on the Linux box.

You’ll need to install the SQL Server Agent on the Linux box as well, which I did by following the steps here under the part titled “Install on RHEL” – https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/linux/sql-server-linux-setup-sql-agent.  Go ahead and do this right after you get SQL Server up and running and are still logged into the machine with PuTTY.

To confirm everything was up and running properly, I connected to the server using SQL Server Management Studio on my local PC.  Everything looked good so far.

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Now, I had to setup my new SSRS instance on a separate machine.  I did this using an Windows Server 2016 Azure VM and simply installing the latest Technical Preview from January on it.  Next up, you need to set the database catalog location in the Reporting Services Configuration Manager.  Keep in mind, you’re limited to using SQL Server authentication to connect to the Report Server database in this scenario (and SQL Server on Linux in general right now).  Everything looked good until I got an error at the “Generating rights scripts” part of the config process for the new database.

I figured I was stuck here until I found this really old blog post from Adam Saxton about the error message I was getting.  The blog post itself wasn’t relevant (sorry Adam), but the very last comment in the thread WAS helpful from Carlos Shepardos.

“If you use a SQL alias to connect to the SQL Server server you have to ensure that the local computer is also able to resolve the SQL alias name via a DNS resolution request. If the local computer is not able to do this you get the error message shown above.

The easiest way to ensure the SQL alias name is resolvable to the IP address of the SQL Server is to create an A record entry in DNS or add a line to the local hosts file.”

So with that in mind, I went to my HOSTS file on the server and added an entry for my SQL Linux instance.  You can navigate the the HOSTS file on your RS server here – C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc

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I then used that name instead of my IP address for my SQL Server instance entry for Reporting Services, and the wizard finished without issue.

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I navigated to my report portal, and it loaded just like you’d expect.

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To test the SQL Server Agent, I created a simple report and dataset while also setting up some subscriptions and cache refresh plans.  Sure enough, they ran successfully and the jobs showed up as expected when I looked in SSMS as well!

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As I mentioned earlier, this still isn’t officially supported quite yet, but I was able to use it without any issues in my (admittedly limited) testing.  Would love to hear about your experiences trying this scenario out as well.  Thanks for reading!