Create your first table export report from a Power BI Dataset in Paginated Report Builder

Welcome back!

In last week’s post, I promised to walk you through how to create a simple table report in Power BI Paginated Report Builder from a Power BI dataset.  Why would someone want to do this, you ask?  Well, how many tables in your Power BI Desktop reports look like this?

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So while you can interact with it in the browser and scroll to see all the rows, when you export it out to PDF, it looks like this.

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Having tables in Power BI reports auto-expand when exporting is a common ask amongst Power BI users.  Unfortunately, the current behavior won’t be changing anytime soon.  With paginated reports, however, your tables can auto-expand across several pages upon export, and they’re designed for just this type of use case.  Let’s walk through how to build a paginated report for this table against the same Power BI dataset.

Make sure you’ve downloaded and installed Power BI Report Builder as a first step.  Once that’s done, create a new blank report as your project.

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From there, right-click on the “Data Sources” folder and select “Add Data Source”

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You have two options at this point –

1. You choose SQL Server Analysis Services as your source and connect to your Power BI Dataset in the service.  (Currently, this requires your dataset be in a workspace backed by Power BI Premium, but this will work against datasets in non-premium workspaces in the near future.)  You’re doing so using the “XMLA endpoint” that was discussed in a recent announcement.  As Christian states in the post, use the following URL format to address a workspace as though it were an Analysis Services server name –

powerbi://api.powerbi.com/v1.0/myorg/[your workspace name]

myorg can be replaced with your tenant name (e.g. “mycompany.com”).

[your workspace name] is case sensitive and can include spaces.

If you’d prefer, you can easily copy the full URL you need from the dataset settings and paste that into your Connection string.  I’ll do that for my report –

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My connection string looks like the following after pasting it in.  Power BI Report Builder will automatically place “Data Source=” in front of the connection string I’ve pasted in to make sure it works properly.

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Click “OK” to save this data source in your report.

2.  Alternately, you can use a Power BI Desktop file locally as your SQL Server Analysis Services data source to create this report against by using the diagnostics port Microsoft documented in 2018.  This may help accelerate development in certain scenarios by allowing you to build this out when you’re traveling on a plane, etc, and also allow you to test performance of the paginated report in more advanced scenarios you want to tackle (I confirmed with Adam Wilson there was no issue with letting folks know about this).  Just make sure you change your connection string for your data source after publishing your Power BI Desktop file and prior to publishing the paginated report to your Power BI workspace using the information I just covered.

Now matter which option you’ve chosen, the tutorial I walkthrough proceeds the same way.

Next, right-click on the “Add Dataset” to add a new dataset to your report.

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Datasets in paginated reports are a little different than those in Power BI reports you might be used to.  A dataset in a paginated report is just a single query that runs against the selected data source and returns data.  You can have several datasets in your report, but in this example, we just need one.

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I’ll name my dataset, select the data source I want to run it against, and click the “Query Designer” to create my query I want to run and return data from.  As I mentioned on Twitter earlier this week, Paginated Report Builder has a visual designer that will craft the DAX query once I drag and drop the fields in I need.  I just need three for this particular query, and get the following result when I execute it.

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Looks like I have everything, so I click OK and then save my dataset.

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Now let’s build the table for our report.  Select the Insert tab, then click Table and choose to run the Table Wizard

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I select the dataset I just created, and drag and drop the fields into the groups accordingly.  I want each row have a “State”, and have each “Year” be a column.  My values are a simple sum of the “DODs” field.  This allows me to have subtotals and grand totals for my groups if I choose to do so.  I have what I need, so I click Next.

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I’ll leave the “Show subtotals and grand totals” checked and complete the table wizard.

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I’m going to delete the column group on the right of my table that says “Total” at the top by right-clicking on it.  With that change, my table looks like the following.

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You don’t see data changing live when you’re designing the report like you do with Power BI Desktop.  Instead, it’s a similar experience to designing a Mail Merge document in Microsoft Word – you’re creating a layout of how you’d like your report to look, then feed the data from the data source to generate the report/document.  To see the report you’ve designed with your actual data, click “Run” from the toolbar under the Home tab.

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Here’s what my report looks like.

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I’ll export it to PDF to confirm it will auto-expand across multiple pages, and sure enough it does.

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If you’ve stayed with me this far through the post, thank you and you’ve finished creating a simple table report against a Power BI dataset.  There’s clearly much more I could do to make this look prettier, but it isn’t necessary in this particular scenario for my users (which is, well, me).  In a follow-up later this month, I’ll have a short final post around publishing this to the service and linking to it from my Power BI report there.

Have a great weekend!

Ten reasons why you should download and learn to use Power BI Paginated Report Builder

Happy weekend all!

Yesterday was a big day for the Power BI team, as we released the first edition of Power BI Paginated Report Builder.  Why is this such a big deal?  Well, while Report Builder has been around for years, many Power BI users have not only never used the product, they’ve never tried to build a paginated report, period.  Now they can do just that, and I’m going to cover the top ten reasons why, if you use Power BI, you should download and learn to use Power BI Paginated Report Builder.

Download Power BI Paginated Report Builder

1. It’s Free.

It’s completely free to download and use.  Who doesn’t like free?

2. It doesn’t require Power BI Premium (or even Pro) to use it.

As many in the community know, Paginated Reports are available in Premium workspaces only (Here’s a link to up vote making this feature more widely available in Power BI – Paginated Reports in Pro and Premium).  However, just like Power BI Desktop, there’s no Power BI license required to use it locally.  So not only can you author reports, you can render and view them like you would in the service.  Take a look at the sample report Paginated Report Bear created back in November in the tool –

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I have a similar experience as I would as a consumer in Power BI, including several key items I’ll cover shortly.

3. You can use it to connect to any Power BI dataset in Premium to build reports

As my colleague Christian Wade announced last week, you can now use the XMLA endpoint to access your Power BI datasets in Premium.  Paginated Report Builder supports this connectivity option as well, and it’s super easy to do.  Simply copy the connection string from the “Settings” tab of your dataset in the Power BI service –

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Then create a new “SQL Server Analysis Services” data source in Power BI Report Builder.  Type the phrase “Data Source =” in the Connection string dialog, paste the copied string from Power BI in there and hit “Test Connection”.  You’ll be asked to sign into Power BI, and assuming you’ve followed these simple steps, it’ll connect successfully and you can start building paginated reports with it!

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4. You can connect to any Power BI dataset via XMLA, even if that capacity or workspace doesn’t also support Paginated Reports

While Paginated Reports are only available in a P1 SKU and above (or A4 SKU and above), the XMLA endpoint is available in every SKU, including down to A1 or EM1.  So you can create and use Power BI datasets from any workspace that supports the XMLA endpoint when authoring your reports.  The only restriction is that when we support publishing reports with Power BI datasets to the service later this month, you just need to publish it back to a workspace that does support Paginated Reports.  Don’t worry that your dataset might be sitting in a different capacity or workspace – we’ll explain more when we announce support in the official blogpost.

5. With the ability to use the same Power BI datasets used for your interactive reports, you can easily create basic paginated reports for scenarios as simple as exporting tables of data, or a print-friendly view of your Power BI Desktop report.

I’ll be the first to admit many things in Paginated Report Builder are harder for report authors to achieve than they are in Power BI Desktop.  But for many basic scenarios, like creating a simple table I know users will want to export out large amount of data from, Paginated Report Builder makes that very, very simple and is often times a better option.  I’ll have a walk through in a follow-up post where I can show you how to do either of these scenarios with your Power BI datasets, in some cases in a matter of minutes.

6. Paginated Reports published back to Power BI don’t have any data export limitations

I covered this in an earlier blogpost – Yes, you can export unlimited** rows of data from Paginated Reports in Power BI, but if your organization has Premium workspaces that support Paginated Reports, this is worth keeping in mind.  Now that you can create paginated reports against your datasets in Power BI Premium, having a simple paginated report for export scenarios might help unlock certain scenarios you couldn’t before for your users.

7. You can print your reports right from Paginated Report Builder

You probably noticed in the earlier screenshot there was a print option for a report you’re viewing in the tool.  You weren’t imaging it – you can print out your report right from the toolbar, and can even look at a Print Layout view of your report while interacting with it.  This option isn’t even available in SQL Server Reporting Services (!), and is a great way to see how your report will look once you do print it out.

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8. You can export your report from Paginated Report Builder to several different formats, including PDF, Word, Excel and PowerPoint.

In addition to the ability to Print, you can also export to several different formats right from the toolbar when viewing your report.  This is a powerful capability that few tools have in their authoring environment right out of the box.

9. In a future update, we’ll have support to connect to Power BI datasets in non-Premium workspaces when authoring reports. 

This will make this even more of a no-brainer, as it’ll open up all the scenarios we’ve discussed in this post to any Power BI dataset.  Look for more details on this in the coming weeks.

10. There’s a lot of material to help you get started

A great place to start is with Patrick LeBlanc from the Guy in a Cube channel, who I work closely with.  He has put together several videos around Paginated Reports to help get you going.  Additionally, you should see several more in the coming weeks as more and more functionality is announced, plus the blog posts I’ll be adding as well.  I’ve added the playlist from YouTube below.

Paginated Reports playlist

I could keep going, but ten feels like a good place to stop on a lazy Saturday.  If you’ve never tried paginated reports before, now is your chance!  Go download Power BI Paginated Report Builder today and learn what all the fuss is about.

Thanks for reading!

Yes, you can export unlimited** rows of data from Paginated Reports in Power BI

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This question has come up more than I can count, so I am doing a super quick blog post to answer it for folks.

Many people are well aware of the limitations around exporting data in Power BI today.  The biggest one I hear about is you can’t export more than 150,000 rows to Excel from a Power BI Report visual.  Since people always want to export data, the question came to me immediately when we released the paginated report capabilities in Power BI if we had the same restriction.  I know from several customers I’ve worked with in the past that many of their SSRS reports are/were nothing more than a single table with some parameters that users visit to dump out the data they need to an Excel or CSV file, so I wasn’t that surprised it came up.

The answer is no, we don’t put any cap on the number of rows you can export from a paginated report in Power BI to Excel, CSV, or any of the formats we support.  The only limitation is the amount of memory that’s available for Paginated Reports in your Premium capacity.  Hence the asterisk in the blog title – eventually you’ll run out of memory if you try to export too much at one time, so if you try to export a table of 1 trillion rows and 40 columns to a CSV file, I’m fairly sure you’re out of luck and will fail.  But as you can see by the picture, I exported one of my reports with over 240,000 rows out to a CSV file without a hitch.

There’s much, much more you can do with Paginated Reports in Power BI (and Patrick LeBlanc has done some awesome videos about a number of those items on the Guy in a Cube YouTube channel), but for those folks who want to use paginated reports to help them with this use case, you absolutely can do so.

Thanks for reading!

Ask Me Anything Unanswered Chat Questions Answered

Last week, I participated in an “Ask Me Anything” session where I answered questions around both Paginated Reports in Power BI, as well as questions around SQL Server Reporting Services and Power BI Report Server.

As I wasn’t able to get to all the questions posted in the chat, I said I’d answer those I didn’t get to in a follow-up post on my personal blog.  So, without further adieu, here’s a recap of the related unanswered questions with my responses.  I’ve broken them into sections focused on Paginated Reports in the cloud, as well as the on-prem offerings (SSRS/PBIRS).

Paginated Reports in Power BI

“any update on parameters? right now they are only on the page header, any chance that this area will get a makeover?”

– You’ll see us doing work to rationalize the toolbar in paginated reports with Power BI reports to the extent it makes sense.  There are certain patterns for paginated reports authors prefer in terms of parameter layout/grouping that we don’t want to disrupt, but the idea is to make the chrome around the reports look/feel similar across both report types.

Will the RLS will be available in paginated reports too?”

– Yes, when paginated reports support connecting to Power BI datasets, we will respect RLS.  We’ll also support it against other data sources when we support user-based authentication for them.

“Is there a recommended resource for testing / exploring paginated reports – i.e., a sample paginated report that can be used as a template?”

– Great question.  I’ll put together a list of resources in a follow-up post, but at a minimum recommend you download Report Builder and follow the tutorial.

“Is printing of multi-page table the main advantage of SSRS reports over Power BI tables/matrix?”

This is another good question – it isn’t an either/or, but rather which is the best tool for what you need to accomplish.  I’m going to cover this in a separate post as well.

“Is there plan to allow embedding Paginated report in SharePoint Online as we can today with PowerBI Report?”

– Yes, this is planned.

“power BI service will we get subscriptions for paginated reports in the same way we have now in SSRS? Also will this be extended to Power Bi reports and dashboards in Power Bi service. Including Data Driven Subscriptions?”

Yes!  You’ll see the current subscriptions in Power BI evolving to give you the options you have with SSRS today for both report types.  This includes scheduling, the ability to send with specific filters/parameters applied, attachment support, etc.

“for now I’m not able to find paginated reports using the search function on the Home page. Any timing when/if this is coming?”

This is a known bug that we’re working with other teams to get resolved.  You should see this fixed in the next couple months.

Power BI Report Server/SSRS

“can we share a .pbix report through emails?”

We aren’t planning to add subscription support for Power BI Reports in Power BI Report Server in the short term.

“Would love to hear about how RLS will be implemented to PBIRS.”

This work is well underway for the January 2019 release of Power BI Report Server.  It will be similar to what you do in the service today, where you set the roles in the desktop and assign users to those roles in the server through the web browser.

“And along the same lines, what about standard templates, such as headers/footers?”

This is an improvement we’d like to look at for the Power BI service as it relates to Paginated Reports, so we’d also look to bring it back to the on-prem product as well.

Looks like the other questions related these areas were all addressed either in the session or in the chat itself.  If you have additional questions, feel free to check the existing FAQ, or leave a comment in the blog comments below!

Download Paginated Report Bear’s sample paginated report for Power BI

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Hi everyone, it’s guest blogger Paginated Report Bear!

Well, actually, Mr. Chris agreed to type for me since I don’t have fingers.  Anyways, if you watched my intro video, I promised you all I’d make a sample report and share it by the end of the week.  Since I always keep my promises (EDITOR NOTE: no he doesn’t), here is my first paginated report that you’re free to download and try out in Power BI!  It uses the Enter Data feature that was introduced a few months ago, so you can upload it as is into your Power BI (Premium) workspace and give it a try.  If you don’t have Premium capacity, use the steps in Mr. Chris’s last blog post to spin up a capacity and try it out yourself.  The report sample has a couple cool tricks in it, like dynamic images based on the parameter you select, so it might be a nice reference for you in the future.

I’ll be creating more samples and talking more about paginated reports in the future (or not, depending if my son gets tired of doing this).

Thanks for reading!

Paginated Report Bear Sample Report

How to use A SKU’s to try out Paginated Reports in Power BI without upfront cost or long term commitment

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Since the Eagles game doesn’t start until later, thought I’d put this together for folks.

As many of you know, earlier this month we announced a preview of Paginated Reports in Power BI.  While folks were excited about this, there were those who were disappointed it was only available (for now) if you had Power BI Premium.

“I don’t have Premium (yet . . .),” they said,  “But I still want to try this out and use it.  How can I do so without committing to it for a month and paying $5000?”

The good news is, there is an easy way to do this.  See, as I’ve stated in previous interviews, you can try all the functionality out by spinning up an Power BI Embedded A SKU capacity, which is available to purchase through Microsoft Azure.  While normally A SKU’s are specifically used for embedding scenarios, there is no licensing restriction against using them internally if you’d like.  However, generally this makes little sense vs. purchasing a P SKU for most use cases, since each user would still need a Pro license to access the Power BI portal AND it’s almost $1000 more per month if you run it all the time.

But if you just want to try out the new functionality that is available only on Premium capacity, the big advantage of A SKU’s is you can stop/start them just like any VM in Azure, and you’re billed by the minute vs. having an initial upfront monthly cost.  This means you can spin up an A SKU, turn on the paginated reports capability in your Power BI portal, and start using it.  And when you’re done, you can go into Azure and pause the capacity until you want to use it again.  Since you’re only billed for the time it’s running, you can try this new functionality out for around 14 cents a minute! (this figure is based on my fuzzy math being done while my son is playing Fortnite right next to me, so forgive me if this is off by a few cents one way or another).  Let’s walk through how you’d go set this up yourself –

I have my own Power BI subscription (yes, I pay out of pocket for this), since I like to have access to the exact same experience as all of my users do (or I forgot to turn it off when I joined the team . . .).  In any event, I have a Pro license, but when I check the Admin Portal, I can see I have no Premium capacities right now.

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Note another tab there which says “Power BI Embedded” – I don’t have any of those capacities, which you purchase in Azure, spun up currently either.

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To get one of those going, I’m going to head to the Azure Portal and login with my credentials that I also use for Power BI.  Why? Because I’m the only user, so I’m also the admin.  Now, I can do a search for “Power BI Embedded”.  This will take me to the management page, which looks like this

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I hit the “Create Power BI Embedded” button, which, if you haven’t signed up for an Azure account yet, you’ll be prompted to do so, and this includes a $200 credit for 30 days.  If you have signed up for Azure, you will skip this step (duh).

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Now that I have that setup, I’ll go back to the portal and get back to the previous screen.  Here, I can click the button again to setup a new Power BI Embedded A SKU.  You need to select at least an A4 capacity size or higher to use Paginated Reports, so I’ll pick an A4 in my home location to spin up.  (NOTE: Paginated Reports are also supported in multi-geo scenarios, even during our public preview, so I could choose other regions outside my home region if I wanted to.)

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Everything looks good, so I’ll hit create and wait for it to finish deploying.

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If I check my Power BI Portal, I see that it is also showing as being deployed there under the Capacity Settings –> Power BI Embedded tab
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Once it’s completed deployment, when I click on the capacity name, I’ll see I can manage this capacity just like I would any premium capacity in Power BI.

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Under the Workloads, I see the two new preview workloads, and I’ll set Paginated Reports to “On” and assign 50% of the memory to that workload.  I can also try out the new Dataflows workload as well, but I’ll save that for another time.

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After a few moments, I’ll see the message has changed from starting to Ready, and my workload is now ready to use.  I’ll assign all (one) of the workspaces for my organization to this new capacity.

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Cool!  Now, I can upload my first paginated report to the workspace and view it.  I’m using a vintage Halo sample report, and it renders without a hitch.

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But now I want to stop using the capacity and not get charged (since I finished this blog post).  No problem – I can go back to the Azure portal and just pause the capacity until I want to use it again.

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When I’ve paused it, I can no longer view my paginated reports in Power BI, but they aren’t deleted or otherwise affected.  They’re still there waiting to be used again when the capacity is started up, and I can delete them if I need to.

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And that’s it – in less than an hour, including the time it took to type this blogpost, I created a new Azure subscription, created my first Power BI “Embedded” A4 capacity, turned on the Paginated Report workload, assigned a workspace, uploaded and viewed my report, and then paused the capacity to stop the billing on it.  Whew!

Thanks so much for reading through the post today, and I hope you all take some time to try out the new paginated reports in Power BI Premium.  And if your organization doesn’t already have Power BI Premium, use this walkthrough to give it a try yourself!

Happy Thanksgiving (week)!

Use Outlook Shortcuts to organize your favorite Power BI Reports and Dashboards

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I haven’t written in awhile, but wanted to get this up while it was still fresh in my mind (and had some time left at lunch).

Did you know Outlook had a shortcuts feature?  I didn’t (or at least I didn’t remember I did), and this video was the only one I could easily find on the topic.  Ostensibly, it’s used to create shortcuts to folders in Microsoft Outlook that you can quickly jump to.  However, as I found out, you can also use it to jump to web content, including content in Power BI!  Just follow these simple steps –

1. In Outlook (I’m using Outlook 2016), head to the shortcuts pane by finding the ellipsis at the bottom of your left-hand navigation area and choose “Shortcuts”
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2. By default, you’ll see two shortcuts

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To start adding web pages as shortcuts, I want to have them organized, so I’m going to right-click on the “Shortcuts” top menu option and create a new shortcut group called “Power BI”.

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3. Once I’ve done that, it should look like this –

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I can now add a web address as a shortcut, but I need to do this in a slightly different way than you might expect.  To do this, I’ll highlight the url in my browser that’s open like the following –

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I’ll then drag this address under my new shortcut group in Outlook and give it a friendlier name (using my right-click menu option to rename the shortcut) so it looks like the following –

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Now when I click the link, it looks like this in Outlook –

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Not only that, it’s fully interactive and I can (seemingly) do all the same things with my dashboard or report I’d do in a separate browser

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I have to be honest – I’m surprised this works as well as it does, and it’s much better than almost any other web page you might pull in there in my limited testing.  And maybe this isn’t that helpful to some folks, but I worked with a lot of former execs who would’ve LOVED to have been to simply to do everything right in Outlook.

Thanks for reading!